Do You See Accelerated Wound Healing When Using HBOT?

This is a common question. While there are countless benefits of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT), many assume the increase in blood flow and oxygenation is the only benefit of HBOT. But, the truth is more complex than that.

This article will explore in-depth how HBOT accelerates wound healing. For decades, physicians and nurses have used Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) in hospitals to treat wounds and other issues such as pneumonia, carbon monoxide poisoning, and decompression sickness. HBOT uses oxygen at a higher pressure than that found at sea level to promote the growth of new tissue and decrease the amount of time (and risk) it takes for your wound to heal.

With HBOT, your body is fully infused with medical-grade oxygen at a concentration 20 times stronger than the air you breathe. This helps to stimulate and accelerate your body's healing powers and processes. Studies show that this helps the body rid itself of toxins and promote healing – whether from injury or simply ageing more gracefully. HBOT is extremely effective in accelerating and stimulating your body's self-healing mechanisms. The pressurized and oxygen-enriched environment created by HBOT oxygen therapy stimulates the growth of stem cells. These specialized cells can regenerate healthy cells, which is needed if your body is recovering from injury. Thus, wound healing is dramatically accelerated.

Combining the effects of high pressure, HBOT allows your body to reach the physiological equivalent of 3-4 weeks' worth of natural healing. This leads to many health benefits, including increased energy and concentration, chronic pain and inflammation relief, faster recovery time, and more!

At HBOT Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, we know that with the principle of HBOT, you can safely and effectively accelerate wound healing. The problem is that healing typically only happens at normal atmospheric pressure. With HBOT, you can see the results in days instead of weeks.

HBOT is clinically proven to boost athletic recovery, aid wound healing, kill bacteria, and help treat several neurological conditions. It's been around since the '90s and is backed by dozens of peer-reviewed studies.

It's the future of treatment for many health issues; It's 100% safe, painless and effective. Unlike traditional surgical solution that only superficially treats symptoms and conditions, HBOT gets to the core of the problem, promoting cell growth to reverse chronic pain and health conditions.

HBOT can also help improve circulation in people with diabetes or poor circulation caused by other conditions. The treatment may also help patients with multiple sclerosis and brain injuries recover more quickly.

Some research shows that HBOT may effectively treat chronic wounds that haven't responded well to other treatments like antibiotics or debridement (removing dead tissue). For example, HBOT may be used to treat burns, carbon monoxide poisoning and radiation injuries — conditions where tissue is damaged beneath the skin's surface.

In these cases, HBOT helps provide needed oxygen to damaged tissue that might not otherwise get enough because it's covered by scar tissue or other dead tissue. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. In particular, wounds that are slow to heal may benefit from HBOT treatments. Hyperbaric Oxygen and Diabetic Foot Wounds/Ulcers:

The FDA approves using HBOT to treat nonhealing wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers. The procedure involves a person entering a pressurized room and breathing
almost pure oxygen. This increases the amount of oxygen in the blood, boosting the oxygen flow to the wound and promoting healing.

HBOT is also used to treat difficult-to-heal wounds from:

  • Burns and other skin injuries
  • Diabetic ulcers
  • Degloving injuries (in which tissue on one side of your finger or toe has been removed)
  • Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) — an abnormal collection of blood at the end of a vein; this leads to swelling in the legs

HBOT aims to increase the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream, which can help heal. The procedure is often used as an alternative to antibiotics for people with certain infections, such as gas gangrene or necrotizing fasciitis.

Overall, it's clear that HBOT can help heal wounds and promote healing. If all goes well, the victims of devastating damages will be able to enjoy a real shot at recovery.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe and effective treatment with many advantages over drugs and surgery. Its recovery rates are consistently high, and its costs are relatively low. And if you're suffering from a nonhealing foot ulcer or another wound, HBOT might be the treatment you've been looking for. All it takes is a little legwork from you to get started. The bottom line is that HBOT can be used to stimulate the body's natural healing process and facilitate healing in several types of injuries.

HBOT can be a helpful alternative for diabetes patients who are struggling to heal their wounds, and it may also be used to help prevent injuries from developing. There's no guarantee that a patient will experience benefits, but HBOT is still the first (and only) FDA-approved therapy for nonhealing wounds. If you have diabetes, speak with your doctor about whether HBOT could be right for you.

If you'd like to learn more about HBOT, we recommend visiting our other blogs or coming to the clinic at Helen Taylor Aesthetics. Helen Taylor Aesthetics offers HBOT aka Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in the heart of Warwickshire in Rugby, within The Midlands. Helen Taylor Aesthetics is just a short trip from Coventry, Leicester or even Birmingham! Join us for a free Hyperbaric Oxygen consultation.

References:

The Non-Healing Wounds of the Brain and the Use of HBOT = https://www.hmpgloballearningnetwork.com/site/twc/articles/non-healing-wounds-brain-and-use-hbot

Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on human skin cells in culture and in human dermal and skin
equivalents = https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1524-475x.1999.00053.x

An evidence-based approach to hyperbaric wound healing = https://acutecaretesting.org/en/articles/an-evidencebased-approach-to-hyperbaric-wound-healing

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy: solution for difficult to heal acute wounds? Systematic review =
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21184071/

Oxygen in Wound Healing - More than a Nutrient = https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Thomas-Mustoe/publication/8694505_Oxygen_in_Wound_Healing_-_More_than_a_Nutrient/links/57a0a41c08aeef8f311c2e75/Oxygen-in-Wound-Healing-More-than-a-Nutrient.pdf